Flash Fiction: The Inspiration Dome

PHOTO PROMPT © Dale Rogerson for Rochelle’s Friday Fictioneers. Other stories featuring the prompt can be found here.

“Tickets for two, please.”

“Welcome to the Inspiration Dome. Admission for the muse free. No refunds though, careful what doors you step through.”

The white door opened. Tannille and her muse stepped through the threshold.

“Surely, there is something inspirational in here?”

“I don’t know. What are you after? A clown? A murder? A space ship? The Cotton Candy Monster?”

“A sex god?”

“Fantastic, we’re exploring erotica now?”

The writer rubbed her chin. “Well, it’s the best-selling genre. All those closet readers.”

“Explains screen zombies smirking in public.”

The pair grew silent, the story spark not happening; the nothing engulfed them. 

“Why are we here?”

“Blog Day again.”

66 thoughts on “Flash Fiction: The Inspiration Dome

  1. Mason Bushell says:

    You and Rochelle both put yourselves in the story today – perhaps I should have done that too!

    I love this idea of writers looking for inspiration. You’re right too it has to be sex or a blood bath to get a look in now.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Tannille says:

      The Wonderful World of Mason. Nothing like referring to yourself in 3rd person. 😀

      I would have loved to explore the concept but I needed more than 100 words. Sex and violence, not sure what it is with humans.

      Thanks M

      Liked by 1 person

      • Mason Bushell says:

        My wonderful sleuth Holly sometimes does the 3rd person thing when she gets mad or affectionate. It’s called illeism – interesting stuff.

        Indeed you could write a book on the sex and violence concept. It’s like humans are becoming cavemen again!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Tannille says:

        Holly is fiction? I didn’t realise there was a word for it – “illeism”. I thought it was a quirk I have. 😀

        It feels like sex and violence are over done. Boring elements on their own.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Mason Bushell says:

        Holly is my own Nancy Drew. Although having written 20 fullsized books with her she’s very real to me. Sadly I failed her as her book reside in a drawer where nobody can read them. There is a glimmer of hope now but I’m not going to jynx it by getting excited.

        I agree so long as sex sells its the only thing that makes money.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Mason Bushell says:

        Hello, Tannille.

        I haven’t fund or ability to do it myself. I have a glimmer of hope which might get revealed soon all being well. But I don’t have much chance of ever seeing my books published.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Mason Bushell says:

        I met Holly in a short story when I was 12. Then she faded out of memory until 2011 when I was 26.

        That year I was cheffing in a hotel and my head chef came in from a break and put her paper on the bench next to me. On the open page was a mystery writing competition.

        So, I created DCI Derek Ward and began writing for the competition. During that Holly returned. I saw her icy blue eyes looking at me, then her smiling face. She wasn’t in the story but she was Derek’s granddaughter and wanted me to remember her.

        I was so captured by Holly, I took the weekend off work and spent it with her. By the sunday, I knew everything about her, had 3 mysteries laid out and was raring to go.

        For the next three years I begin work at 5AM and work until 1PM. I’d go to the library and write with Holly until 4PM and then work from 5PM until 10PM. Get home and write for an hour before sleeping and then repeat the next day.

        Holly helped me through a lot of tough times and became very special to me. Then I failed her by getting criminal publishers and making a mess of her mysteries in the eyes of editors.

        So yes definately a labour of love.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Tannille says:

        Holly sounds like a friend. It’s amazing how close we can get to a special character. Amazing she’s been with you since childhood. How old is Holly?

        I admire your dedication. Doing it (writing) is the hardest part. Turning up every day when pesky life throws balls. I’m still mastering focus.

        In this case, go with your gut. If you were writing something… not sure of the words… that doesn’t touch your soul, let editors do their thing. I think a lot writers eventually create a world that they don’t want tainted because it feels organic/alive/special. Other stories we love but don’t bring that feeling, more like write them and unleash them on to the world.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Mason Bushell says:

        She really is a friend to me.
        As of the last book I wrote Holly was 20. I pretty much chronicled her life from birth in her tales.

        The writing for me was exciting. It was my place to go to hide from life. So, the dedication was easy. The hard bit was was the publishing. It very nearly destroyed my bond with Holly through all the hurt heaped upon her stories.

        The allowing editors to work on Holly’s stories is the hardest bit for me. I feel like they’re stealing her from me. Like every word is a razor blade cut to her and me. That alone might stop me getting there.

        Like

  2. Dora says:

    T.,
    There was everything to like about this tale: the wit, the dialogue, the pacing, the imaginative use of setting. But best of all? The humor. Hats off yet again.
    pax,
    dora

    Liked by 1 person

    • Tannille says:

      The conversations with the muse are like writing about nothing. Amusing what comes out. Never fails. Although there has been the odd prompt that even she wont come out for. 😀

      Thanks J

      Like

    • Tannille says:

      The Inspiration Dome is a concept I would like to explore. I like the idea that muses talk to each other and there are collective meeting places where they play together.

      Thanks P!

      Like

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